Oregon Electronic Visit Verification: True or False Series

As we get closer to Oregon’s planned Electronic Visit Verification roll out for Personal Support Workers statewide, ODDS has begun posting a series of Fact or Fiction Facebook posts to help community members better understand what’s happening and what to expect.

Currently, there is an EVV pilot happening in southern Oregon with one brokerage and one county (Creative Supports Inc. and Jackson County). Full implementation is expected sometime summer 2019. Information and training details are all forthcoming.

If you need a refresher, here’s some details from Oregon Developmental Disabilities Services:

“EVV is part of a federal law that was passed by Congress in 2016. The 21st Century Cures Act requires states to verify the delivery of Medicaid-funded Attendant or Personal Care services in real time (at the time the service is occurring) from providers. The EVV system must electronically capture the following information at the time the service is occurring:

  • Type of service performed
  • Individual receiving the service
  • Date of the service
  • Location of the service
  • Individual providing the service
  • Time the service begins and ends

EVV will be required of all PSWs in Oregon by 2019. The 21st Century Cures Act also recommends that states seek stakeholder input from family caregivers, PSWs, and individuals receiving services along with other stakeholders when developing their EVV systems. See PDF presentation for more information.”

Be sure to follow the eXPRS Facebook page and bookmark the ODDS Electronic Visit Verification Project web page to stay on top of the latest developments.

Check out the slideshow below with a few of the True or False posts from the eXPRS Facebook page.

eXPRS EVV True or False

eXPRS EVV True or False

eXPRS EVV True or False

eXPRS EVV True or False

eXPRS EVV True or False

eXPRS EVV True or False

ODDS Announces Change to Provider Agency Billing Process

The following message was emailed to Provider Organization contacts by the six Portland metro area brokerages on 02/02/2019.

 

IMPORTANT NOTICE TO OREGON PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS
RE: APD-PT-19-003* Policy Transmittal: Agency Billing Activities Effective 2/1/2019

As of Friday, 2/1/19, most eXPRS submissions by provider organizations will automatically be paid by ODDS without case management review. (Service codes OR539, OR570, and OR310 are excluded from this change.) The Oregon Office of Developmental Disabilities Services (ODDS) will conduct post-payment reviews of provider organization documentation. This change may expedite payment to some provider organizations, but it does not change documentation requirements.

Oregon Administrative Rule 411-415-0090 requires Case Management Entities (both CDDPs/counties and Brokerages) to conduct extensive and specific monitoring of services including but not limited to:

  • Ensuring all services provided align with those authorized in the ISP
  • Confirming support and progress toward goals
  • Confirming individual choice is being honored

The review of provider organization progress notes is an invaluable tool in meeting these monitoring mandates. For this reason, the six Portland metro-area brokerages will continue to expect to receive progress notes for all services delivered. Per the state’s transmittal, these notes must include:

  • Customer name
  • Provider of service
  • Dates of service (the date range is sufficient)
  • Units of service provided (total number of units for the period is sufficient)
  • A progress note summarizing the service provided and progress toward goals (weekly or monthly summaries are perfectly acceptable)

As guidance, please review the following from the Indirect Case Management Monitoring Worker’s Guide:

Adequate provider agency progress notes focus on describing the supports a person received to achieve the desired outcome. These include the ADL, IADL, medical and behavioral supports identified on the ISP as being needed. The notes should focus on the specific activities (i.e. “visited a museum”) only insofar as they are important to achieving the desired outcomes as described in the ISP. Simply stating the name of the service associated with the procedure code is not sufficient (i.e. “Provided Day Support Activities” is not an adequate progress note to support a claim by the agency or for the purposes of indirect monitoring.) An adequate note will allow a SC/PA to determine if the services are consistent with those authorized in the ISP. Provider agency progress notes are also a place for the provider to convey observations about possible changes in support needs, challenging behaviors and a wide variety of topics. These reported observations should be reviewed by the SC/PA for their potential impact on risk identification, new person-centered information, and service planning. The SC/PA’s supporting progress note should reflect their assessment of the observations and the actions they will take in response, if any.

This excerpt demonstrates that progress notes are an important tool in monitoring supports and communicating changes in an individual’s needs and choices. As such, we request that providers submit progress notes for all supports no later than one month after the provision of services. For example, notes for services provided in February will be due by the end of March.

In compliance with the transmittal, we will be notifying ODDS when we do not receive progress notes within the 30-day window.

We anticipate that issues with overlapping billings will likely continue. As CDDPs/counties Brokerages are no longer part of the invoicing and payment processes, providers will need to seek resolution of these issues from ODDS.

Finally, we trust that our provider organization partners share our values with regard to continuing to offer customers the authority to review and authorize their services via signature. We will have one-on-one conversations with each of our customers regarding their options, and plan to solicit broad customer and family input on how to ensure choice continues to be offered and honored.

Thank you for your continued partnership and your service to our shared customer base as we work together through this next transition.

 

*Source: http://www.dhs.state.or.us/policy/spd/transmit/pt/2019/pt19003.pdf

 

 

Ready for College? Learn More About PSU’s Inclusive College and Employment Program

A Special Announcement from Ann Fullerton, Professor Emeritus of Special Education, Portland State University

Do you know an adult with developmental disabilities that wants to go to college? The Career & Community Studies Certificate at Portland State University provides a four year inclusive college and employment program for individuals with intellectual disabilities in Oregon.

  • Person-centered planning and self-directed goal setting
  • A unique weekly schedule including academic courses, employment and campus involvement
  • Students learn to manage their own schedule and use supports they need
  • Part-time employment on or off campus each term
  • Enrollment in 1-2 college courses each term with other PSU students
  • Choose and participate in PSU’s recreational, social and student organizations
  • Academic coaches, peer navigators and CCS advisors support students to succeed in college


But how could they afford it? 
We have adult students in CCS that are financially independent, receiving SSI and working part time while they attend college. They are eligible for financial aid to go to college. Also, because our students are working in competitive wage integrated employment, they are eligible for an Individual Development Account (IDA). For dollar they earn and place in their IDA account they receive a $3 match up to a total of $12,000 for their education. Lastly, Charles Taylor of Mountain Crest Counseling Services has created our first scholarship for CCS students. 

How can we learn more? Attend INFO NIGHT Jan 17th. 6 pm Smith Memorial Union 1825 SW Broadway Portland, OR 97201 ROOM 330

Email us at tcio@pdx.edu. We would love to talk to you. We can respond via email, phone call, or schedule an appointment to visit us. Review information on our website: https://www.pdx.edu/career-and-community-studies/

What is the deadline to apply? Application Deadline March 2, 2019 (We provide support to apply!)

How My Son Cody Sullivan Made History

By Ann Sullivan

When my son Cody Sullivan (AKA Coach Cody), was born with Down syndrome, I knew he would make a great difference in the world. This has rung true for the past twenty-two years, culminating on April 28th, 2018 when he became the first person with Down syndrome to graduate from higher education. 

Cody was included in general education from kindergarten through grade 12. He wasn’t shoved into a secluded classroom where they took trips to the park to pick up litter or wipe down tables in the cafeteria. Cody learned alongside his peers – and just by being included – he taught people that having a disability isn’t scary.

When he was a high school senior, Cody’s friends were delightfully sharing where they were going to college. This inspired him to seek the same. Concordia University Portland agreed to have Cody attend classes and work toward earning a certificate of achievement in elementary education. We have been part of the West Coast Think College Coalition, which is focused on creating opportunities for individuals with intellectual disabilities to attend higher education.

On April 28th, graduation day at Concordia University, Cody was the first person with Down syndrome in Oregon to cross the stage and receive his certificate. As he crossed, his many friends erupted in love and joy with a standing ovation.

Today, Cody works as a Teacher’s Aide at a local charter school.

Learn more about the West Coast Think College Coalition here and listen to Cody’s interview on KXL FM News 101 here