Download a copy of the Transition Resource Handbook

ODDS Statewide Employment First Coordinator Acacia McGuire Anderson writes:

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) states that transition planning must begin at age 16. However, transition planning may begin as early as 14 years of age. The sooner we start transition planning, the better for the young person so they can connect to ODDS (Office of Developmental Disabilities Services) and VR (Vocational Rehabilitation) services and begin the process of exploring career options and skills needed to be successful in the workforce.

In Oregon, we have Transition Network Facilitators (TNFs) who provide outreach, technical assistance, and training opportunities for educators, individuals and families, and collaborate with VR counselors, providers and DD case management entities (such as Brokerages and CDDPs/counties). The TNFs are also launching a podcast series in January aimed at providing information and resources to educators, individuals and families throughout Oregon.

There is a website with a wide variety of resources: http://triwou.org/projects/tcn. This includes the Transition Resource Handbook, a map of TNFs by region, and much more.

A list of the ODDS regional specialists, VR I/DD counselors, TNFs and Pre-ETS Specialists is on the Employment First Training web page: https://www.oregon.gov/DHS/EMPLOYMENT/EMPLOYMENT-FIRST/Documents/VR-ODE-ODDS-Regional-Employment-Specialists.pdf

There are upcoming trainings where educators, as well as VR staff and DD providers and case managers, can learn more about transition planning. These include the Oregon Statewide Transition Conference, happening March 7-8, 2019, in Eugene. In addition, ODE, ODDS and VR collaborate to put on regional trainings throughout the state.

If you have any questions regarding transition planning beginning as early as age 14, or any questions regarding transition services in general, email: employment.first@state.or.us. Thank you for all your efforts as we strive to support people with I/DD to live and work in their communities.

 

 

 

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