Independent Living Resources

Independent Living Resources (ILR) is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping people with all disabilities. The agency provides services using both staff and volunteers.

Classes/Groups:

  • Art
  • Cooking “Individualized Assessments”
  • Crossroads Discussion (TBI) Group
  • Peer Counseling Class
  • Ready to Rent
  • Visually Impaired Support Group
  • Women’s Support Group
  • Writing Group

For class schedule see ILR’s Newsletter.

Healthy Lifestyles – Healthy Lifestyles is a self directed goal setting program to help individuals live a healthier life. This program also offers ongoing mentoring. To learn about Healthy Lifestyles, please call Sarah Gerth at 503-232-7411 or
E-mail:sarah@ilr.org.

Housing – ILR can answer many questions about housing for you. We can provide help with the following:

  • Advocacy and Education
  • Community “Tenants Rights and Responsibilities” Training
  • Fair Housing Amendments Act
  • Landlord/Tenant Mediation
  • Ready to Rent Class

Skills Instruction – At ILR we offer skills instruction, both individual and in small groups, which can help people with disabilities acquire skills to live more independently.

Examples of topics:

  • Anger management
  • Braille and Orientation & Mobility Instruction
  • Communication Skills
  • Household Management
  • Leisure/Recreation
  • Personal Safety
  • Pre-vocational Information
  • Self-Esteem
  • Social Skills

Sports/Outdoor Recreation – For people with disabilities who are interested in sports or the outdoors please join us. We offer a variety of outings and activities. Please contact Patricia Kepler at 503-232-7411 or patricia@ilr.org if you are interested in learning more about our outdoor recreation program.

Volunteer Program – ILR’s services are provided by both staff and volunteers. Volunteers are essential to the success of this organization. They enable us to provide services without exceeding our budget. Volunteers serve in many capacities at ILR, including the Board of Directors, peer counselors, and teachers. Please contact Sarah Naomi Campbell sarahnaomi@ilr.org if you find interest in becoming an ILR volunteer. Download Volunteer Application

STEPS Program – It’s often said that knowledge is power. STEPS empowers participants by providing information about rights and responsibilities, and helping them develop the skills needed to hire and manage Homecare Workers.Call Suzanne to sign up for the next workshop at ILR.  Each workshop is from 10:00 AM until 3:00 PM, and lunch and snacks are included.  Eligible participants (see below) will receive a comprehensive handbook, follow-up services as needed, and a $25 gift card.  To register, or for more information, call the STEPS Training Coordinator (503) 232-7411 or email STEPS@ILR.org.

WIN (Work Incentives Network) – Thinking about work but concerned about benefits? The Work Incentives Network can help you create a plan for success! WIN can help you understand how work will effect:

  • Social Security Benefits
  • Medical Benefits
  • Food Stamps
  • Housing Assistance
  • And More..

To learn more about working and disability benefits, call us at 503-232-7411 or email info@ilr.org. You can also call our partners on this project, Disability Rights Oregon, at 503-243-2081.

Impact Northwest

Impact NW’s mission is to help people achieve and maintain self-sufficiency and to prevent and alleviate the effects of poverty. In the 2007-2008 fiscal year, Impact Northwest served over 70,000 individuals.

Their clients include low-income children, adolescents, adults with disabilities, seniors, and families. Working with schools, businesses, faith communities, community-based organizations, and governmental agencies, Impact Northwest creates a safety net and springboard for Portland residents seeking to improve their quality of life.

Safety Net Services:

  • homeless family shelter
  • rent and housing assistance
  • utility assistance
  • food, clothing, transportation
  • information and referral
  • client support services
  • access to health care & income assistance

Education Support Services:

  • youth tutoring & mentoring
  • social & educational activities
  • early childhood education
  • community school coordination
  • youth development
  • before & after school activities (SUN)

Employment Support Services:

  • youth employment training
  • Richmond Place homeless transition services
  • skill-building classes
  • beyond shelter homeless transition services
  • access to vocational training
  • job referral

Community Involvement Services:

  • volunteer placement
  • student internship and work study site
  • public education
  • employee & group community service site
  • system advocacy & community organizing

Seniors and Adults with Disabilities:

  • transportation
  • advocacy/case management
  • meal sites and activity centers
  • legal and tax assistance
  • low-income energy assistance
  • shopping trips and friendly visits
  • respite
  • health promotion activities
  • multicultural events
  • service access

Oregon Developmental Disabilities Services by County

Ever wondered what services are available beyond your own county? Check out the DD Coalition’s fact sheets on county services for more information.

Baker County
Benton County
Clackamas County
Clatsop County
Columbia County
Coos County
Crook County
Curry County
Deschutes County
Douglas County
Grant County
Harney County
Jackson County
Jefferson County
Josephine County
Klamath County
Lake County
Lane County
Lincoln County
Linn County
Malheur County
Marion County
Mid-Columbia: Hood River, Wasco, Sherman Counties
Morrow, Wheeler, Gilliam Counties
Multnomah County
Polk County
Tillamook County
Umatilla County
Union County
Wallowa County
Washington County
Yamhill County

Need Help at an Upcoming IEP?

Looking for some assistance with an upcoming IEP for you or your child in transition? OrPTI (Oregon Parent Training and Information Center) ensures that IEP Partners available to families who could use some extra help with the IEP process.

What is the Partners Program?

The Partners Program trains and matches Partners with parents wanting support at their child’s IEP, Transition or Mediation meeting. Our goal is to have Partners in every community throughout the state of Oregon.

Who are Partners?

Partners are parents and others who have gone through a two day intensive Partner Training Program. Partners are volunteers for the Oregon Parent Training and Information Center (OrPTI). They receive a stipend for each meeting that they attend as assigned by OrPTI.

What is the role of a Partner?

Partners are not at the meeting to speak for you. Their role is to help you prepare for the meeting, plan an agenda, identify the issues, write out proposals etc. At the meeting they will take notes and act as a trained listener who is familiar with special education rules and regulations. Partners model parent/professional partnerships and collaboration.

Can I have a Partner attend my meeting?

We currently have Partners available in most areas of the state. Due to the great demand, we are only able to provide each parent with a partner for two meetings per student per school year.

To have a Partner attend your meeting you need to give the OrPTI as much notice as possible before the meeting (two weeks is preferable). If you call the day before your meeting, we may not be able to make a match, so please plan accordingly. Partners are not always available and we may not have a partner in your area. We continue to hold trainings throughout Oregon in hopes of being able to support parents in all parts of the state.

Before a Partner can contact you, a release of information form must be signed and returned to the OrPTI. This form will be provided for you by mail or email which ever you prefer. We would also appreciate you filling out a Partner Evaluation Form, your feedback is important to us, we will use the information you provide to improve this program.

To request a Partner please call the Special Education helpline at 1-888-891-6784.

Disability Secrets – Online Resource for Navigating Social Security

Disability Secrets is an online resource for applying for Social Security and navigating the appeals process.

About the site:

The purpose of this site is to distribute information that, typically, is impossible to get from the person taking your claim for SSD and SSI benefits. In essence, applying for disability and SSI benefits might as well be a secret process since Social Security does not try to make this information clear or even understandable.

Statistically, seventy percent of all SSD (a.k.a. SSDI) and SSI claims, represented or otherwise, are denied at application. What does this mean for ssd and ssi applicants who are disabled and need help? That they should follow this advice tip: learn everything you can about the benefit approval system to better your chances of winning, with or without the help of a disability attorney or lawyer.

The information, tips and advice presented here can help you understand: 1) How to apply for benefits with the Social Security Administration, 2) How the SSDI and SSI system works, 3) What SSA doesn’t tell you about the application and appeal process, 4) What you can do on your own as a disabled applicant to help your case, 5) When you should consider getting a disability advocate, representative, or attorney and 6) What you should never do that might potentially harm your case.

This is simply the information you should be able to get from a representative at the Social Security Administration, but almost never will.

If you suffer from a medical, psychological, or psychiatric impairment and have initiated or been denied on a social security disability, or ssi, claim for benefits, this site may assist you with your case.

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